• ISSN 16748301
  • CN 32-1810/R
Volume 33 Issue 1
Jan.  2019
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Association between exposure to particulate matter during pregnancy and birthweight: a systematic review and a metaanalysis of birth cohort studies

  • Studies of the associations between maternal exposure to particulate matter (PM) and risk of adverse effects on fetal growth are inconsistent and inconclusive. This question can be well answered by carefully designed birth cohort studies; however, so far the evidence from such studies has not come to the same conclusion. We sought to evaluate the association between maternal exposures to PM and low birthweight (LBW) enrolling 14 studies from 11 centers, and to explore the influence of trimester and exposure assessment methods on between-center heterogeneity in this association. Data were derived from PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, CNKI, and WanFang database, references from relevant articles, and results from published studies until March 2017. Using a random-effects meta-analysis, we combined the coefficient and odds ratios (OR) of individual studies conducted among 14 birth cohort studies. Random-effect meta-analysis results suggested that a 17% and 6% increase in risk of LBW was relevant to a 10 mg/m3 rise in PM2.5 and PM10 exposure concentrations at the 3rd trimester (pooled odds ratios (OR), 1.17 and 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94–1.46 and 0.97-1.15, respectively), but the null value was included in our 95% CI. Our results showed that exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 during pregnancy has a positive relevance to LBW based on birth cohort studies. However, neither reached formal statistical significance. Negative impacts on outcomes of birth is implied by maternal exposure to PM. Further mechanistic researches are needed to explain the connection between PM pollution and LBW.
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Association between exposure to particulate matter during pregnancy and birthweight: a systematic review and a metaanalysis of birth cohort studies

    Corresponding author: Yankai Xia, email:yankaixia@njmu.edu.cn
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Institute of Toxicology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211166, China;
  • 2 Key Laboratory of Modern Toxicology of Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211166, China;
  • 3 Department of Research and Education, The Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003, China;
  • 4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China;
  • 5 Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, China

Abstract: Studies of the associations between maternal exposure to particulate matter (PM) and risk of adverse effects on fetal growth are inconsistent and inconclusive. This question can be well answered by carefully designed birth cohort studies; however, so far the evidence from such studies has not come to the same conclusion. We sought to evaluate the association between maternal exposures to PM and low birthweight (LBW) enrolling 14 studies from 11 centers, and to explore the influence of trimester and exposure assessment methods on between-center heterogeneity in this association. Data were derived from PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, CNKI, and WanFang database, references from relevant articles, and results from published studies until March 2017. Using a random-effects meta-analysis, we combined the coefficient and odds ratios (OR) of individual studies conducted among 14 birth cohort studies. Random-effect meta-analysis results suggested that a 17% and 6% increase in risk of LBW was relevant to a 10 mg/m3 rise in PM2.5 and PM10 exposure concentrations at the 3rd trimester (pooled odds ratios (OR), 1.17 and 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94–1.46 and 0.97-1.15, respectively), but the null value was included in our 95% CI. Our results showed that exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 during pregnancy has a positive relevance to LBW based on birth cohort studies. However, neither reached formal statistical significance. Negative impacts on outcomes of birth is implied by maternal exposure to PM. Further mechanistic researches are needed to explain the connection between PM pollution and LBW.

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